Plenty at the squarre new flat

Welcome to my blog

 

Here you can add some text to explain what your blog is about and a bit about you.

By re-considered, May 19 2018 04:24PM

Probiotic Drinks


What are they ? Fermented drinks made using and containing beneficial bacteria/yeasts which help maintain a healthy microflora in our digestive tracts.

Probiotics –

• fight off harmful bacteria

• boost immunity

• increase energy and enhance digestion


Each probiotic drink has its own strains of bacteria and yeasts and each culture tends to have its own fermented drinks.


Process of fermentation is used to make these drinks – live organism growing and multiplying as it eats food supplied converting it into acid and alcohol.

Lactic acid produced by probiotics helps achieve good acid balance in our stomachs

Sugars from plants are metabolised and most water based probiotic drinks contain small quantities of alcohol – levels are small but can be manipulated e.g. in the case of ginger beer


Secondary Fermentation -

• allows probiotics to continue to multiply and drink becomes richer

• Adds flavour – with the addition of fruit/vegetables/tea etc

• Creates an effervescent drink

Recipes


1. Beet Kvass – nutrient dense drink made from fresh beetroot. – Typically Russian and Eastern European. Beets are full of antioxidants, folate, manganese, potassium, vitamin C and fibre.


I large beet diced into ½ inch pieces

2 litres of water

1 tbsp salt


Scrub and chop beets – add to jar and fill with water.

Leave to ferment for a minimum of four days and up to two weeks, strain and drink.



2. Kanji - traditional punjabi fermented drink – served as an appetiser – again rich in nutrients and minerals


2 medium beetroots

6 medium carrots

2 ½ tablespoons ground mustard seeds

1 teaspoon chilli powder

8 cups of lukewarm water


Scrub or peel veg, chop into strips. Put mustard and chilli powder in jar and pour on water – stir until dissolved. Add chopped vegetables. Cover and leave on windowsill. Leave for three to five days stirring twice daily. Strain and bottle. Keep in fridge



3. Lacto fermented lemonade – uses whey to ferment lemon juice and sugar.

Strain natural yogurt until 1 cup of whey is obtained.

Add whey, 1 ½ cups fresh lemon juice and ¾ cup sugar to a large jar. Stir and leave at room temperature for 2 days. Bottle and store in fridge.


Can flavour with raspberries boiled and sieved. Sage boiled with lemon and sugar is also good to flavour.


4. Ginger Beer - three stage process


1. Make a ginger bug using 3 tablespoons grated ginger, 3 tablespoons raw sugar, cup of water. After 24 hrs, once a day for one week add 1 teaspoon grated ginger and one teaspoon sugar and stir. After one week the liquid should start to bubble.


2. Next pour 8 pints of water into a clean brew bucket and add 1 cup ginger bug, 1 ¼ cups of sugar, ½ cup lemon juice, half a cup of ginger. (could make ginger tea first by boiling up grated ginger in 2 cups water – add to bucket. ) Cover with tea towel. Stir twice a day – leave until bubbling. Taste and add more sugar if wanted.


3. Bottle and leave in dark room for two to four days. Be careful to check for fizz levels. Beware of leaving too long! Can add fruit flavours at this point.


5. Water kefir – uses kefir grains (matrix of bacteria and yeast)

Dissolve half a cup of raw sugar in 2 L of water and add kefir grains. Cover jar with cloth and leave at room temperature for 2 to 3 days. Strain and bottle for secondary fermentation.

To flavour add 100 percent pure fruit juice about 1 cup juice to 3 cups kefir. Pour into bottles and seal. Leave at room temperature for 2 to 3 days.


Flavourings: Orange and ginger (3 cups or, two tablespoons fresh ginger), raspberry (2 cups raspberries, 1/4cup sugar boiled up in 1 cup water.), Lemonade (1/2 cup lemon juice, ¼ cup water, ¼ cup sugar)


6. Milk kefir – uses a different strain of kefir “grains” which look like mini cauliflowers – colonies of bacteria and yeast. The resultant, yoghurt-like drink is very rich in probiotic bacteria, vitamins A, B1, B6, D and folic acid.

Add grains to a jar and pour milk on top. Cover with a cloth bound with an elastic band. Leave at room temperature to culture. Once it has become thick and sour tasting strain using a plastic sieve to extract kefir grains from kefir and start again. Store resultant kefir in fridge until ready to drink. Can be blended with fruit to make a delicious lassi style drink. NB Coconut milk can be used instead of milk.

7. Kombucha – a naturally effervescent drink made from fermented tea. Rich in probiotics and acetic acid (a mild natural antibiotic) It also contains lactic acid, B vitamins, folate and antioxidants. Uses a SCOBY which needs to be kept out of direct sunlight. It requires an optimum temperature of 23 – 29 degrees Celsius to flourish.

Brew a strong tea solution – 10 tea bags (can use black or green tea) and dilute to 8 pints. Dissolve 1 cup of sugar and add to a large jar. Cool and add SCOBY. Cover with cloth bound with an elastic band and leave in a warm (temperature range of 20 – 28 degrees celsius is optimal), dark place. Allow to brew for 5 – 7 days. IMPORTANT: If you see any mould on the surface of the SCOBY discard it and the entire batch. The SCOBY grows on top of the kombucha to fit the width of the jar. A new one will be produced every batch. This can be peeled off and given away. The kombucha can then be bottled with various fruit juices of your choice at a ratio of 1 to 6 juice to kombucha. These bottles should be left in a warm, dark place for 2 – 3 days to undergo secondary fermentation and then kept in the fridge before drinking. If you want to take a break from brewing leave the SCOBY in a jar in some starter liquid in a warm dark place covered with a cloth.



By re-considered, Mar 27 2018 08:59AM

Lacto fermentation is an ancient preserving technique which harnessses beneficial,lactic acid forming bacteria. These bacteria thrive in an anaerobic environment. Lactic acid is, in turn, a natural preservative that inhibits the growth of harmful bacteria. Lacto-fermentation also increases or preserves the vitamin and enzyme levels, as well as digestibility, of the fermented food.


Here are some of the recipes we like to make...


Simple Sauerkraut


Ingredients


One cabbage head (white or red) finely shredded

we like to add carrots to add extra interest

1 large tablespoon sea salt (not table salt)


Mix cabbage and salt together in a large mixing bowl and begin to squeeze the cabbage and salt together with your hands, knead it thoroughly to break up the cellular structure of the shredded cabbage.

When the cabbage has become limp and releases its juice, transfer it to a large wide necked jar or kilner jar. Pack the salted vegetables into the jar or fermenter as tightly as you can, eliminating air bubbles.

Continue packing the cabbage into the container until the cabbage is completely submerged by liquid. Cover loosely and allow it to sit at room temperature, undisturbed, for at least 1 month and up to 6 months, testing the sauerkraut every few days until it is done to your liking. Transfer to the refrigerator or other cold storage where it should keep for at least 6 months and up to 1 year.


You can add different ingredients to your liking e.g. juniper berries, black pepper and other spices, apple, beetroot or other vegetables. Wetter fruits and vegetables will make the mix wetter and change the texture. Fruit with sugar will also change the taste/amount the mix ferments.


Kimchi


Ingredients


Cabbage 1 head

3 x carrots

mouli/turnip 300g

1 tablespoon good sea salt


For the paste

Spring onions 1 bunch or 1 x leek

Ginger root sliced thinly - 1 thumb's worth

Garlic x 8 cloves

Korean chilli flakes (Gochigaru) 4 x tablespoons

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon sugar

water 2-3 tablespoons



Method as above i.e. massage cabbage, turnip and carrot with salts to release juices.

Slice leeks and ginger add to blender with other paste ingredients and blend. Add water to blender to make a thick paste. Thoroughly mix paste into vegetables. Bottle and top up jars with brine to ensure vegetables are submerged. Leave at room temperature to ferment. Check daily, release pressure and top up with brine if needed. Kimchi should be ready in around 3 weeks. Keep in fridge once it has reached desired fermented flavour




Fermented chilli sauce



Ingredients



Chillies handful

Carrots 1-2

Garlic

Ginger

Good quality salt



Take some chillies (preferably red, orange or even yellow make a nicer looking sauce, but you can do it with green too)


Chop and layer them in the bottom of a jar


Chop and layer carrots in the jar


Top up jar with brine ( at a concentration of 1 tablespoon salt in 1 litre of water)


Leave to ferment for a month or 2


Blend and bottle (keep sauce refridgerated)


Armenian Pickles


A stunning, purple pickle with the mouthwatering flavours of dill and horseradish.


Taken from the book Mamushka: Recipes from Ukraine & Beyond by Olia Hercules


Makes a 3-litre jar

beetroots 2, peeled and sliced into discs

white cabbage ½ small, sliced into wedges

mixed runner beans or French beans 200g, tailed

spring onions 4

wet (new) garlic 1 head, left whole, outer layer peeled

dill heads or stalks 50g

horseradish leaves 2, or fresh horseradish 50g, chopped

blackcurrant leaves 2

sour cherry leaves 2

water 1 litre

sea salt flakes 3 tbsp

black peppercorns 10


Place the beetroot at the bottom of a warm, sterilised 2-litre preserving jar, then top with the cabbage wedges, beans, spring onions, garlic and all the aromatics, apart from the peppercorns.


Bring the water, salt and peppercorns to the boil in a saucepan, then pour over the vegetables. Make sure everything is submerged, then seal and leave in a warm part of your kitchen (25C) for about 3 days to pickle, then store in the refrigerator. The beetroot will gradually turn everything a deep pink. It should keep unopened for several months.



By re-considered, Dec 10 2017 06:22PM

Italian Lemon Jam


A revelation ! a way of using whole lemons without all the shredding involved with marmalade making. The result is a wonderful tangy/lemony jam. Be careful of overboiling - this jam sets really well.


Wash 2Kg lemons (keep one aside), place them in a pan of boiling water and cook for 20 minutes, drain, change the water, bring it back to the boil, replace the lemons and cook for another 20 minutes. Do the same for a third time, then remove the lemons with a slotted spoon and retain the cooking water. Cut lemons into chunks and pass them through a food mill with large holes in the disc; (or remove pips and blend) weigh the puree and put in a saucepan with the same weight of sugar and one litre of the reserved cooking water. Put the pan on the heat and cook the jam for about 5 minutes, then add the uncooked reserved lemon, cut into pieces, and cook for another 10 minutes. Pour the hot jam into airtight jars, screw on their lids and let them rest until cool. Keep them in a cool place. (should keep for up to 6 months)


Lemon and Ginger Marmalade (from: Cornersmith: Recipes from the cafe and picklery by Alex Elliott-Howery and James Grant)



• 1 kg lemons

• 150 - 300 g) ginger, depending on how strong you like it, peeled and thinly sliced into

matchsticks - optional

• 1.5 kg sugar



1. Juice all the lemons. After juicing, flatten each lemon half on the bench with the palm of your hand and then slice as thinly as possible into matchsticks.

2. Put the lemon shreds and juice into a jam pan or large wide saucepan, then add 2.5 litres of water and the ginger, if using. Bring to the boil, then simmer over low heat for about 1-1 1/2 hours, or until the lime rind is soft and translucent.

3. Turn off the heat and slowly add the sugar, stirring until it has dissolved. Bring the marmalade back to the boil over medium heat, then boil steadily, stirring every now and then, for about 20 minutes or until it reaches setting point. Allow marmalade to sit for 5 minutes or so. (lemons have a high pectin content so setting point was quick to reach)

4. Meanwhile, sterilise jars. Carefully fill the hot jars with the hot jam. Invert jars for 5 mins to ensure air is sterilised within the jars, seal. Store in a cool, dark place for up to 2 years; once opened, refrigerate and use within 6 months.


Grapefruit and Juniper Marmalade


As above but using grapefruit and adding 2 tablespoons crushed juniper berries instead of the ginger


Pear and Lavender Jam (From The Modern Preserver - Kylee Newton)


41/2 lbs pears

21/2 tbsp lemon juice (about 1/2 large lemon)

31/2 cups granulated sugar

5 tbsp classic pectin

1 vanilla pod

1 tbsp edible dried lavender


1: Peel and core the pears. Cut half of the pears into 1/4 inch pieces and blend the other half in a food processor.


2: Put the diced pears together with the blended pulp into a large jam pan with the lemon juice, 3 cups of the sugar, and the pectin.


3: Bring slowly to boil on a moderate heat, stirring intermittently.


4: Split the vanilla pod lengthwise, remove the seeds, then stir the seeds through the remaining sugar with a fork, mixing thoroughly. Add the vanilla sugar and vanilla pod to the pan and stir to dissolve.


5: Boil steadily on a moderate heat for about 30 minutes, stirring intermittently, until it thickens and starts spitting.


6: Use the wrinkle test to check for a soft setting point, then, when ready, take off the heat, remove the vanilla pod and skim off any scum from the surface.


7: Stir through the dried lavender, then pour into warm, dry sterilized jars and seal. Keeps unopened for up to 6 months. Once opened, refrigerate and eat within 4–6 weeks.



By guest, Nov 15 2017 09:16PM

We had a great time on our October workshop. The theme was preserving the harvest and looked at a a few techniques for preserving seasonal gluts including bottling, pickling, fermenting and drying.


Here are the recipes we used:


Simple Sauerkraut


Ingredients


One cabbage head (white or red) finely shredded

we like to add carrots to add extra interest

1 large tablespoon sea salt (not table salt)


Mix cabbage and salt together in a large mixing bowl and begin to squeeze the cabbage and salt together with your hands, knead it thoroughly to break up the cellular structure of the shredded cabbage.

When the cabbage has become limp and releases its juice, transfer it to a large wide necked jar or kilner jar. Pack the salted vegetables into the jar or fermenter as tightly as you can, eliminating air bubbles.

Continue packing the cabbage into the container until the cabbage is completely submerged by liquid. Cover loosely and allow it to sit at room temperature, undisturbed, for at least 1 month and up to 6 months, testing the sauerkraut every few days until it is done to your liking. Transfer to the refrigerator or other cold storage where it should keep for at least 6 months and up to 1 year.


Bread & Butter Pickles


This is one of our best sellers on our market stalls. Our understanding is that 'bread and butter' refers to the fact that this pickle is a staple like bread and butter. it is a traditional dill pickle. We have tried and tested a few recipes and this one is our favourite and most reliable for a deliciously textured (perfect crunch) pickle. The vegetables are salted and then preserved in a light vinegar. They are delicious with burgers, salads and as an accompaniment to any number of dishes. We have used the recipe from the truly inspirational Cornersmith from Sydney and can highly recommend their recipe book.


http://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/bread-and-butter-cucumber-pickles


Earl Grey Bottled Pears


This recipe uses a fragrant earl grey syrup.


Ingredients:


1.4 kg pears, about 8

1 vanilla bean (optional)

4 cups water

2 cups granulated sugar

4 Earl Grey tea bags


Peel, quarter and core pears.

To make the syrup add the water to the sugar and stir over a low heat until dissolved. Add the tea bags and allow to infuse to desired strength and remove. Simmer pears in syrup to heat through but not cook. Remove pears from syrup and pack into hot sterilsed jars. Pour over hots syrup and remove air pockets with a sharp utensil. Seal with lids and boil in a water bath for at least 10 mins.


Hot Green Tomato Sauce - and excellent, quick way to preserve green tomatoes.




RSS Feed

Web feed